German public want ‘no major concessions’ to Tories in Brexit talks 

’Nein danke’: No appetite for special Brexit deal in Germany 

THE VAST MAJORITY of Germans want a hard-line taken against Tory negotiators in Brexit talks, according to public polling published by heute.de.

An overwhelming 88 per cent want “no major concessions” granted to the UK now that the process has begun on exiting the European Union. 

The news is a further worrying sign for the Westminster Government that it has limited room for negotiation, having raised expectations of controlling immigration, maintaining free and open trade, moving away from EU rules and laws, and agreeing a full trade deal - all within just an 18 month negotiation window. 

Brexit minister David Davis MP predicted before the referendum that the German Government would come under severe pressure from German industry to back the British.

“Within minutes of a vote for Brexit, the CEO’s of Mercedes, BMW, VW and Audi will be knocking down Chancellor Merkel’s door, together with the leaders of Europe’s other key industries, demanding that there be no barriers to European access to the British market,” he claimed

Previous polling found that the German public was also highly supportive of Scottish membership of the European Union, with 71 per cent in support and only 10 per cent opposed. 

However, this turned out not to be the case and German Chancellor Angela Merkel has maintained a firm line of insisting that the benefits of the single market and freedom of movement - which the Tories want curbed - are indivisible. 

The polling also found that 76 per cent of Germans do not expect any great economic harm to hit Germany as a result of Brexit, with only 18 per cent having economic concern over the talks. 

The position of Germany - which goes to the polls this Autumn - is arguably the most important factor in how the EU27 will proceed with Brexit talks, scheduled to be negotiated then ratified between now and March 2019. The EU Council of member states set out the draft guidelines to the European Commission for talks, with leaders in Berlin considered the most influential in charting the EU’s direction. 

Previous polling found that the German public was also highly supportive of Scottish membership of the European Union, with 71 per cent in support and only 10 per cent opposed. 

Picture courtesy of Hernan Pinera

Check out what people are saying about how important CommonSpace is. Pledge your support today.