Nationalists raise thousands for anti-BBC billboard campaign

Group says it aims to expose BBC "distortion" but Beeb says it will not "pay deference to one particular political viewpoint or another"

A GROUP of Scottish nationalists have just about raised enough money to pay for giant billboard across Scotland accusing the BBC of "distortion".

Inform Scotland has raised £7,000 of an £8,500 target to pay for adverts on 10 poster sites which it claims will draw "everyone's attention to the ways in which they are being lied to". 

The BBC rejected any suggestion that their coverage was partial.

On its crowdfunding page, Inform Scotland wrote: "We know that a significant minority of people in Scotland still trust the BBC as a publicly-funded broadcaster, and are quite unaware as to how they are being misled.

"Here is a rare chance to find out and to share the truth about Scotland and it's future." John Robertson

"We want to give people a bridge to alternative narratives to what they regularly hear on BBC Scotland or read in the so-called 'Main Stream Media'.

"We are aiming for 10 giant posters across Scotland. We will buy as many poster sites as your generosity allows. Our members intend to repeat this process with other posters on this or similar subjects."

Former professor of media politics at the University of the West of Scotland, John Robertson, threw his weight behind the campaign, saying: "Ninety-nine per cent of what we hear and see on BBC Scotland comes from mouthpieces of anti-independence sources. Here is a rare chance to find out and to share the truth about Scotland and it's future."

The crowdfunding page features a mocked up board show the Reporting Scotland logo, beside the text "BBC is Misreporting Scotland".

However, the plans have prompted controversy within the wider Yes movement, with a number of people expressing both concern and support on social media channels.

 

 

A spokesman for the BBC said its priority was to provide fair and impartial coverage, and not toe a party line: "Public service journalism exists to scrutinise and ask questions of those who are responsible for public policy decisions, while also doing the same for those who oppose them - no matter which political viewpoint they represent.

"Because of the way we are funded we don’t, as some newspapers do, follow any particular political viewpoint – it is our responsibility to provide outlets for as many voices as possible as we strive to provide fair and impartial news coverage.

"Reassuringly, audiences continue to tell us that the BBC is still the news provider they trust most, while we take heart from the fact that Reporting Scotland is by far the most watched news programme in Scotland with almost half a million viewers tuning in every night.

"There are those who would clearly like our journalism to pay deference to one particular political viewpoint or another - that is not, nor will it ever be, our role." BBC

"We therefore reject any suggestion that our coverage is partial.

"There are those who would clearly like our journalism to pay deference to one particular political viewpoint or another - that is not, nor will it ever be, our role."

The Advertising Standards Authority was unwilling to comment, but said it would always expect advertisers to obey rules and ensure adverts are not misleading, harmful or offensive. 

Picture courtesy of Go Fund Me

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